NEP

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What Academies Do for Students

One hundred percent of freshman at the NEP Lab School (exclusive of two who moved out of state) returned for their sophomore year, despite the fact that they had their choice of all high schools in the New York City school system. Students identified three major reasons for their decisions to return. First, a feeling that they belonged with the teachers and other students here. Second, that teachers expected more of them than others typically had. Third, they believed the Cultural Academy for the Arts & Sciences was successfully preparing them for college. (p. 4)

Thompson, Mark A.; Varano, Diane; (2009). Sophomore Student Return Assessment. National Educator Program, Denver, CO



Our findings suggest that students from career academies have higher academic achievement upon leaving high school, less need for remediation in English at the university, and increased graduation rates from the university than students who are not from academies. (p. iii)

Maxwell, Nan L. (1999). Step to College. Moving from the High School Career Academy through the Four-Year University. National Center for Research in Vocational Education, Berkeley, CA



The findings also indicate the academy students are more likely than their non-academy peers to report that they attend school primarily because they like it and are interested in what they are learning, rather than attending school only to avoid the potential negative consequences of not attending. Furthermore, academy students are more likely to see a connection between what they are learning in school and their futures. (p. 38)

Kemple, James J. (1997). Career academies. Communities of support for students and teachers: Emerging findings from a 10-site evaluation. Manpower Demonstration Research Corp., New York, NY


Obsolete curriculum content is of little value; but one organized properly, with cutting-edge content can benefit students by exposing them to the latest information and experiences related to a broad theme. (p. 61)

Finch, Curtis R.; Frantz, Nevin R.; Mooney, Marianne; Aneke, Norbert, O. (1997). Designing Thematic Curriculum: An All Aspects Approach. National Center for Research in Vocational Education, Berkeley, CA



The participating career academies have attracted large numbers of applicants with a high degree of demographic and educational diversity. Their broad appeal extends to students who were at risk performing poorly or dropping out of school, as well as to students to do well in school. (p. ES-2)

The participating career academies vary in ways that underscore their adaptability to each schools needs and circumstances, demonstrating that the approach can be implemented and a wide range of school settings. (p. ES-2)

Kemple, James J.; Rock, JoAnn Leah (1996). Career academies. Early implementation lessons from a 10-site evaluation. Manpower Demonstration Research Corp., New York, NY


The academy graduates were strongly motivated to work toward their goals, even if this meant committee work and study or holding down full or part-time jobs while going to school.

To a greater extent than the comparison group, they had been enrolled in post-secondary training at some time, they continue to hold high educational aspirations, and plan to continue striving to meet the educational objectives.
Reller, Dorothy J. (1987). A longitudinal study of the graduates of the Peninsula Academies. Final report. American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, Calif.



Academy students achieved higher pass rates on district proficiency tests in reading, mathematics, and writing, and have higher average scores on all but one test at one grade level.

The school dropout rates for academy vs. non -academy 10th grade students were about the same, but at the 11th and 12th grade levels, only about one-third as many academy students dropped out.

Reynolds, Dorothy F. (1984). The Peninsula Academies. Third yearly interim report. American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, Calif.